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How to Stay Motivated

How to Stay Motivated: Do it Your Way

Article by Olivier Poirier-Leroy of YourWorkoutBook on How to Stay Motivated

Social media can be a real son of a bee sting. Sure, it helps us stay in touch with friends and family, but it also shows us the endless trove of workout pictures from our gym addict friends, which tend to make us feel even worse about ourselves. And so we try to do what they do.

First mistake, bucko. Odds are you already know what works best for you.

“I think the most important part about motivating clients is to let them lead the conversation,” says Kelly Gibson, CPT, of Kelly Athletics on how to stay motivated.

“They know what works best for them, they just need someone to hear that they understand and support their beliefs. Once there is a mutual understanding, it is a good time to introduce clients to ideas of what foods and exercises might help them on their path.”

Remember: we all respond differently according to interests, exercise history, and everything else that goes into making us a special little snowflake. Embrace your individuality and stick with what you know that works instead of trying to emulate what someone else is doing.

If you like my motivation style so far, try a FREE consultation to see if my Nutrition Coaching services would be a good fit for you! I’d love to hear from you and help you find your motive.

Check out 14 more tips on how to stay motivated here.

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The Signature St Patrick’s Day meal

Corned Beef and Cabbage has become the signature St Patrick’s Day meal. Why?

Corned beef and cabbage isn’t actually the national dish of Ireland. You wouldn’t eat it for a St Patrick’s Day meal in Dublin, nor would you be likely to find it in County Cork. So how did Corned Beef and Cabbage become synonymous with the Irish?

Cabbage

During the time of the Irish immigration to the U.S., the first generation of Irish-Americans were in search of the comforting tastes of their homeland. A St Patrick’s Day meal meant boiled bacon. But the immigrants were too poor to afford the high price of pork and bacon products. Instead, they turned to the cheapest cut of meat available: beef brisket. Given that New York City was a melting pot for immigrants from around the world, rather than boil the beef, the Irish adopted cooking methods from other cultures. Brining was a technique of the Eastern Europeans, which is a way of salt-curing meat.

And the corn? Well, “corned” has nothing to do with corn but instead refers to the corn-sized salt crystals used during the brining process. The corned beef was paired with cabbage, as it was one of the cheapest vegetables available to the Irish immigrants.  So are you really celebrating Irish heritage from the old country or wanting to somehow feel connected to an ancestors’ heritage?

corned beef nutrition facts

Image Source: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beef-products/3488/2

The corned beef and cabbage was an alternative to an already unhealthy meal. It’s also an unhealthy option for you, your family and our planet as it is extremely high in saturated fats, cholesterol, and sodium.  Let new traditions of eating ethical plant-based options start now so future generations can be celebrate your legacy of being compassionate.  Pair your cabbage dinner with a meatless alternative like my delicious Glazed Lentil Apple Walnut Loaf.  Also be sure to visit Kelly’s Meanest Greenest Juice Recipe for breakfast and Derek’s Raw Broccoli Soup Recipe for a healthy St Patrick’s Day meal!
Article written by: John Bergdoll, guest writer from the Vegan Energy blog.
Article edited & posted by: Kelly Gibson, 3-year Vegan Personal Trainer and Plant-Based Nutrition Coach from Kelly Athletics LLC
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Can I Get Too Much Calcium?

Can I Get Too Much Calcium or Should I drink more Milk?

We are all taught to drink milk for calcium.  We hear it on the radio, at school, from our parents, and all of the milk advertisements.  After years of hearing the same thing over and over again, you’d think we get the hint right? But the latest research raises the question Can I get too much calcium or do I need more?

It turns out, cow’s milk isn’t all that great for us after all.  Tons of people have stopped buying milk and are now getting almond milk, coconut milk, rice milk, and other dairy-free alternatives. You may have noticed this trend the past few years is that more and more people are going dairy-free.  I’ve written about how drinking cows milk weakens bones, and consuming more than 600mg of Calcium has NO benefit to bone health.  Even more interesting, dairy products don’t seem to improve bone health in children, prevent stress fractures in adolescents or women.  Osteoporosis is, in fact, best prevented by reducing sodium intake and consuming more plant-based sources of calcium like leafy greens, beans, fruits, and vegetables (NOT milk).  So by asking the question can I get too much calcium, the answer is yes.  

Unfortunately, milk is in many of our processed foods, put in our meals at restaurants, and even slipped into some of our multi-vitamins and protein shakes.  How will we ever manage to go completely dairy-free?  Luckily I am a fully committed vegan who knows about all the cool vegan options!  Just contact me below if you need more ideas or guidance on your journey to a plant-based or dairy-free lifestyle.

Here are 3 dairy-free alternatives to standard cow’s milk products:

Tofutti: Cream Cheese

Follow your Heart: Vegan Gourmet Sour Cream

Earth Balance: Organic Whipped Buttery Spread

 

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Written by Kelly Gibson on 3/8/2017

 

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